We can be joyful at all times not because we are spared affliction but because we are completely satisfied in Christ.


We can be joyful at all times not because we are spared affliction but because we are completely satisfied in Christ.

Jesus promises that we will suffer. In Matthew 10:17-18, Jesus warns his followers, “Be on your guard against men; they will hand you over to the local councils and flog you in their synagogues. On my account you will be brought before governors and kings as witnesses to them and to the Gentiles.” Although that quote may seem distant or irrelevant to Christians today, the point remains that, in the words of Christ, “if the head of the house [Jesus himself] has been called Beelzebub, how much more the members of his household!”

Not only does Jesus promise that believers must suffer, the Apostle Paul assures us that the path to being an heir of God demands sharing in the sufferings of Christ (Romans 8:17). Similarly, Paul writes this to those in the church at Philippi: it has been granted to you on behalf of Christ not only to believe on him, but also to suffer for him (Philippians 1:29).

Clearly, we, as Christians, will not be spared affliction. (In addition to the Scriptures above, see Acts 9:15-16, Philippians 3:10-11, and 1 Timothy 1:8-9.)

Despite being assured affliction and suffering, Christ-followers can be joyful nonetheless.

We can be joyful not by creating a bubbly-faced facade of happiness to hide reality but rather by confidently knowing that, in the face of immense sin and suffering, we are secure in Christ. Why fear and be saddened by those who can only kill the body when you’re protected by Him who can keep you from hell (Luke 12:4-7)? Or, to put it positively, rejoice that you have received the Holy Spirit, who guarantees your eternal salvation—and thus, your eternal joy (2 Corinthians 1:21-22).

The faith that justifies is the very same faith that satisfies. Saving faith satisfies us by weaning us from the short-lived satisfaction of sin to ultimate satisfaction in Christ.

Thus, despite the fact that suffering will come even—or, perhaps, especially—to us who profess faith in Christ, we can have great joy not because we are spared affliction but because we are completely satisfied in Christ.

When you refuse to love people because they’re hard to love, you forget the fact that God always loves you, even though you’re not always easy to love.


When you refuse to love people because they’re hard to love, you forget the fact that God always loves you, even though you’re not always easy to love.

God’s love for you is unconditional and everlasting. God loves you exactly as you are, and He loves you no matter what you do. God doesn’t love you because you are a “good” person; instead, God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us (Romans 5:8).

God is abounding in love and faithfulness (Exodus 34:6).

In 1 John 4:9-11, we are told that, because of God’s love for us, we ought to love one another: This is how God showed his love among us: He sent his one and only Son into the world that we might live through him. This is love: not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son as an atoning sacrifice for our sins. Dear friends, since God so loved us, we also ought to love one another.

“One another” even includes those that are hard to love. Remember, God loves you even though you’re not always easy to love. Therefore, you, also, ought to love others, especially those that aren’t easy to love.

Every action you take is a seed you sow, and every seed you sow is a harvest you’ll reap.


Every action you take is a seed you sow, and every seed you sow is a harvest you’ll reap.

Have you ever had a thought like this: “Nobody would ever notice”? Or this: “It’s just a little thing”? But to God, every action — big or small — is important, because every action you take is a seed you sow.

For example, say that you tell your boss you worked eight hours when really you only worked six. But on the other hand, it’s only two hours, and “nobody will ever notice.” However, you’re sowing seeds of dishonesty in your life that will reap a harvest of the very same thing.

Do not be deceived: God cannot be mocked. A man reaps what he sows. The one who sows to please his sinful nature, from that nature will reap destruction; the one who sows to please the Spirit, from the Spirit will reap eternal life. (Galatians 6:7-8) Don’t think that you can lie to someone (i.e. sow a seed of dishonesty), but yet expect to reap a harvest of truth in your life.

Proverbs 22:8 warns that He who sows wickedness reaps trouble.

Therefore, be very careful about how you act in every area of life, because every action you take is a seed you sow, and every seed you sow is a harvest you’ll reap.